Business

Minneapolis tweaks city code to allow gender neutral restrooms

The Minneapolis City Council unanimously passed a resolution and an ordinance change on Friday allowing businesses to have gender neutral, single-use restroom facilities. The issue was raised by the Minneapolis Transgender Issues Work Group.

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Daybreak Bookstore brightens St. Paul's Grand Avenue

A bookstore is one of the only pieces of evidence we have that people are still thinking.

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Babe's new diet: Nanomaterials in animal feed

How much would you pay for a pork chop that was two percent leaner? Would you eat such a pork chop if nanoscale minerals were mixed into the hog feed to achieve that two percent reduction? Such questions are before the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) as it considers what to advise the animal feed and mineral supplement industry about their efforts to incorporate atomic- to molecular-sized materials into feed.

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Debate continues on what to do at Upper Harbor Terminal site

At the end of the year, the city-owned Upper Harbor Terminal will stop operating, ending an era that began when the site opened in 1968. The 48-acre industrial stretch on the west side of the Mississippi River between the Lowry and Camden bridges is destined for transformation in the coming years, but just what shape it will take remains up for discussion.

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Farming into the future: Hmong American Farm

“Farmers often work twelve-hour days,” Yao Yang explained. Having water available near the field is a big deal. That’s often not the case on rented fields, but it’s an important part of the Hmong American Farm. So are the simple washing sheds where they can prepare produce for market, and the cooler where produce can be stored until it’s picked up for delivery.

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Seward Cafe at 40

The Seward Café, which turns 40 years old some time this year, is a study in contradictions. Although it’s known for its longevity, laying claim to being both the oldest collectively-managed business in the Twin Cities and the oldest collectively-managed restaurant/-café in the U.S., its actual collectives seem to turn over completely about every seven years. Although the café has never been totally vegetarian (the principle is even enshrined in its charter), it has always remained a favorite among vegans and vegetarians. This is probably due to its great range of vegan baked goods and its adherence to an ethos of care with its veg customers by assuring careful separation in the kitchen and full disclosure of ingredients. And further, although it looks small and scruffy and like anything but a gourmet haven, some of its food items are nearly legendary in their greatness. And its amazing survival attests to its success with the public.

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Turning beer into food: Jacquie Berglund's company, FINNEGANS, does well doing good

(Photo by Sarah Whiting) "It's social, it's fun and you meet a lot of community-minded people. ... You make a difference." -- Jacquie Berglund

Sitting on a couch in her office, amid pillows bearing the slogans "Irish Holy Water" and "Drink Like You Care," Jacquie Berglund reflected on her initial career forays - good jobs, just not the right fit. After graduating from Augsburg College, she worked for a recruiting firm - "my first taste of business," she recalls. "I loved it, but it didn't have enough meaning. I think I'm just hardwired for [meaningful work]."

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Minneapolis mulls gender neutral restrooms

(Photo by Lisa Jacobs published under Creative Commons License)

An antiquated Minneapolis code relating to the service industry forces many businesses to have gendered restrooms, but a policy change passed by a city committee could change that.

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State opens medical marijuana manufacturer applications

Minnesota advanced in its plan for making medical marijuana available for patients next year as it opened up applications Friday for potential manufacturers of the drug.

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Amend the Constitution to restore the democracy the Roberts court killed

Money is not speech. Corporations are not persons. Most of us intuitively understand that. The Supreme Court clearly does not. In Citizens United v. FEC, it ruled that corporations have a First Amendment right to expend unlimited amounts of money to influence elections. More recently, in McCutcheon v. FEC they struck down the overall caps on how much money wealthy individuals can contribute directly to campaigns and to party committees. The Supreme Court’s decisions are wrong and they deserve to be overruled with a constitutional amendment to restore the First Amendment to its rightful place protecting American democracy, instead of as a tool to suppress speech rather than enhance it.

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